Welcome to the page dedicated to the men who lost presidential elections.

Name: John Adams
Lost to: George Washington
Party: Federalist
Year: 1788
Description: Adams was an extremely qualified runner-up in the first presidential election. He was a Founding Father of the United States, became a lawyer after attending Harvard University and had an incredibly thick and dense job resume. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congress, the minister to the Netherlands, and the minister to the Court of St. James. He was a leader of the Federalists Party and supported a stronger central government. He lost the election due simply to the act that Washington was extremely popular, regarded as the father of our nation, revolutionary leader, and military hero. Washington won the election unaminously by those days voting standards.

Name: John Adams
Lost to: George Washington
Party: Federalist
Year: 1792
Description: John Adams was once again runner up in the 1792 election. He obviously still had all the previous qualifications to take office but this time aroud, he could add one more, he was the first Vice-President of the United States of America under George Washington. Adams once again lost to the more popular Washington.

Name: Thomas Jefferson
Lost to: John Adams
Party: Democratic-Republican
Year: 1796
Description: Thomas Jefferson was another Founding Father with an impressive list of priot work, much like John Adams. He had served in the Second Continental Congress, he was the Second Governor of Virginia, he was a member of the Congress of the Confederation, a Minister to France, and the 1st Secretary of State while he was a member of George Washington's Cabinet. He and James Madison had also effectivel formed the Democratic-Republican Party while he was serving in Washington's Cabinet. Adams was seen as a more natural succesor to the Presidency after Washington essentially resigned by refusing to run for a third term. Adams pulled out the close victory and Jefferson assumed the rold of Vice- President.

Name: John Adams
Lost to: Thomas Jefferson
Party: Federalist
Year: 1800
Description: This election pitted a Federalist President Adams, against his Democratic-Republican Vice President, Jefferson. Adams was the incumbent President and also had the impressive list of qualifications we discussed earlier. Jefferson also had a very impressive resume (see election of 1796), and could now add the title Vice-President to it. Jefferson ended up winning after an incrdibly nasty campaign even by todays standards. This election signalled a relatively peaceful transfer of power of the Federalists to the Democratic-Republicans and swas the beginning of the end for the Federalists Party.


Name: Charles C. Pinckney
Lost to: Thomas Jefferson
Party: Federalist
Year: 1804
Description: Charles Pickney was one of the less qualified presidential runner ups during this early period in American History. He had previously served in the lower house of the South Carolina State legislature while they were transitioning from the British Empire to independent statehood. He had represented South Carolina at the Constitutional Convetnion, was an officer during the Revolutionary War, and also served as a Minister to France. He essentially lost the election in a landslide which favored Thomas Jefferson, the incumbent President.


Name: Charles C. Pinckney
Lost to: James Madison
Party: Federalist
Year: 1808
Description: In 1808, the struggling Federalists once again nominated Charles Pinckney, the man from the previous election who had somewhat mediocre qualifications ( See election of 1804). He faced the extremely qualified James Madison, who had been Secretary of State, a Congressman, and a primary player in the writing of the US Constitution. Pinckney actually did better that he did the the previous election but still lost by a considerable amount.

Name: DeWitt Clinton
Lost to: James Madison
Party: Federalist
Year: 1812
Description: In the election of 1812, the still dwindling Federalists party decided to nominate a New York politician named DeWitt Clinton. Clinton had been the Mayor of New Yor City, a Senator in the US Congress, and also Lieutenant Governor of New York for a short period of time. He was also an incredibly big part of the construction of the Erie Canal and served as a member of the Erie Canal Commision. Clinton actually had a fairly good showing in the election of 1812. He took 47 percent of the popular vote, but really fell behind in the electoral college as he took only 89 votes to Madison's 128.

Name: Rufus King
Lost to: James Monroe
Party: Federalist
Year: 1816
Description: Rufus King was one of the most qualified men that the Federalists had nominated for president since John Adams. King has served on the Massachusetts State Assembly and was also the youngest member of the Confederation Congress. He had worked closely with Alexander Hamilton in the past was a major reason Massachusetts ratified the Constitution of the United States. In 1789, he served on the New York State Assembly and was later appointed Senator of the state. He was offered the position of Secretary of State in Washington's Cabinet, but declined, and was later appointed the Minister to Great Britain. He had been the Vice-Presidential Canidate for the Federalists Party in 1804 and 1808. Despite all these qualifications, he was destroyed in both the electoral college and popular vote. This was the last time the Federalists Party had a canidate who even had a chance to become president. The Party essentially fell apart after this election.

Name: John Quincy Adams
Lost to: James Monroe
Party: Democratic-Republican
Year: 1820
Description: I chose not to really discuss John Quincy Adams and his qualifications for this election because even though he was technically the runner up, he had a 0 percent chance of winning. John Quincy Adams recieved only one electoral vote, during this so called "Era of Good Feelings" where essentially everybody agreed Jamed Monroe should be President. Only 1 faithless elector from New Hampshire casted a voted for John Quincy Adams and he did so not because he believe he should be President, but he didn't want James Monroe to win unaminously because he believed George Washington should be the only man to hold that accomplishment.

Name: Andrew Jackson
Lost to: John Quincy Adams
Party: Democratic Republican
Year: 1824
Description: This election was basically a giant mess. You had four men who wall had a shot at winning the Presidency. In the end, you had two men come out on top and, Henry Clay, one of the other canidates, ended up effectively deciding who would become President through what is know today as a corrupt bargain. Andrew Jackson had been a Member of the House of Representatives, a Senator, Military Governor of Florida, and played a huge role as a military commander in the War of 1812. He actually beat John Quincy Adams in both the elecoral college and popular vote but still didn't win because of a loophole. Since there were four canidates this year, Jackson, Adams, Crawford, and Clay, who all recieved a fair number of votes, Jackson didn't recieve the majority vote (over 50% in either vote). Since no canidate won the majority, the election went too the House of Representatives, who had to choose from the top three canidates, Jackson, Crawford, and Adams. Clay had finished fourth, so was no longer in the running, but he was also the Speaker of the House at the time. Since he was the Speaker, and the House of Representatives got to choose the President, he essentially got to choose who became President. Since Jackson had been less than kind to Clay during his campaign, and Crawford was now a cripple after suffering a stroke, Clay chose Quincy Adams to become President, even though Jackson, the runner-up, had gotten more electoral and popular votes than him.

    • Honorable Mentions of the 1824 election
Henry Clay of the Democratic-Republican Party
William H. Crawford of the Democratic-Republican Party

Name: John Quincy Adams
Lost to: Andrew Jackson
Party: National Republican
Year: 1828
Description: This election saw the fall of an incumbent President, to the man who actually should have been elected president four years earlier (see election of 1824). John Quincy Adams had an incredibly list of qualifications heading into this election and a lifetime of full of accomplishments. He had been a Minister to the Netherlands, Prussia, Russia, the Court of St. James, and served as the 8th Secretary of State. He had served in the Senate and House of Representatives, had been the "runner-up" in the election of 1820, and was the incumbent President. Jackson once again ran with Calhoun as his Vise-Presidential Nominee, but this time he won by a fairly substantial margin.


Name: Henry Clay
Lost to: Andrew Jackson
Party: National Republican
Year: 1832
Description: In the election of 1832, we saw an incredibly qualified and influential politician in Henry Clay take on the incumbent President Andrew Jackson. Clay burst onto the political scene in 1812 as a yound Warhawk in Congress, pushing for war against Great Britain. He had served as a longtime member of the House of Representatives, he was a Speaker of the House an amazing 3 times , Secretary of State under Quincy Adams, had also served in the United Stated Senate, and was a Presidential canidate in the election of 1824. He was also a huge reason the Missouri Compromise took place. Despite all these qualifications, Andrew Jackson defeated him in a somewhat landslide election.

    • Honorable Mention of 1832 Election
William Wirt of the Anti-Masonic Party


Name: William H. Harrison
Lost to: Martin Van Buren
Party: Whig
Year: 1836
Description:** In 1836, the Whigs nominated a war verteran from Ohio name William Henry Harrison. Helead American forces against Native AMericans in the famous battle of Tippecanoe and went to serve as a General in the War of 1812. These accomplishments are what he's mostly remembered for, but he also had a fairly impressive list of political accomplishments as well. During the very early years of our nation, he served as the Secretary of the Northwest Territory. He had also served as Representative, Senator, Governor of the Indian Territory, and was the US Minister to the nation of Columbia. The problem with this election was the higs ran 4 different canidates and split the parties vote. The Whig party as a whole got more votes than Van Buren, but since it was split between four canidates, an Buren won the election.

Name: Martin Van Buren
Lost to: William H. Harrison
Party: Democratic
Year: 1840
Description: In the election of 1840, an incumbent President Martin Van Buren, a Democrat, lost the election. He was a politician from New York who had an impressive reume even if you didn't include the qualification of incumbent President. Before he was elected President, he served at the Attorney General for New York, served in the Senate, was the Governor of New York, and under Jackson he served as the 10th Secretary of State, the US Minister to Great Britain, and Vice President. The reason he lost the election was the Whigs were finally able to come together and unify as a party. A problem that had cost them the previous election (see election of 1840).

Name: Henry Clay
Lost to: James Polk
Party: Whig
Year: 1844
Description: The election of 1844 had an extremely surprising result. Henry Clay, a man of many political achievments (see election of 1832), was once again running for President a third time and he was expected to win. The general consensus across the nation was, he had paid his dues and it was his time to finally be the nations leader, he deserved it. The Democrats nominated the little known Polk and he burst onto the scene as dark-horse canidate for the Presidency. He won by basically appealing to the idea of Manifest Destiny and supporting the annexation of Texas and claiming of Oregon. This campaign platform appealed to many people and ultimately won him the Presidency because Clay did not support the Annexation of Texas, for he was a Whig, and didn't want slavery to expand.

Name: Lewis Cass
Lost to: Zachary Taylor
Party: Democratic
Year: 1848
Description: In the election of 1848, the Democrats didn't nominate President Polk for re-election, a rare and bold move. Instead they nominate a Michigan Lawyer name Lewis Cass. Cass, who was know for his huge support of the idea of Popular Sovereignty, has served as the Territorial Governor of Michigan, the Secretary of War, he had been the US Minister to France, and also served in the US Senate. The Whigs, out of desperation, nominated at war hero in Zachary Taylor who didn't necessarily follow all the parties principles. But somehow, he surprisingly won the election.

Honorable Mention of 1848 Election
Martin Van Burn of the Free Soil Party

Name: Winfield Scott
Lost to: Franklin Pierce
Party: Whig
Year: 1852
Description: In the election of 1852, the Whigs once again struggled to find a canidate to nominate, and once again, they chose a war hero in Winfield Scott. He was an incredibly seasoned veteran of war, but basically had no political experience. Scott basically had very little support because he didn't support clavery, which caused him to lose the South, but his Party didn't openly state they were against slavery, so he also lost support in the North. As a result, Franklin Pierce, a Democrat, won the election in a landslide victory.

Name: John C. Fremont
Lost to: James Buchanan
Party: Republican
Year: 1856
Description: The election of 1856 saw the creation of the Republican Party and their first Presidentil canidate in John C. Fremont. Fremont was an explorer of the West, whose depictions had inspired the Mormons to settle in Salt Lake. He had also lead countless amounts of people to the area of Oregon. He was a key figure in the Mexican-American War, as it related to California, he served as a Military Governor of California and later a Senator. Fremont did rather well, considering he was his parties first ever canidate. What killed him was the fact that Buchanan pushed the idea that the Republicans were anti-slavery extremists who if elected, would lead us into a civil war. It also didnt help that a viable third party canidate in Millard Filmore took a considerable number of votes also.

    • Honorable Mention of the 1858 Election
Millard Filmore of the Know-Nothing Party

Name: John C. Breckinridge
Lost to: Abraham Lincoln
Party: Southern Democratic
Year: 1860
Description:** There are a handful of elections hat have really changed the course of America for many years to come, and this is one of them. It perhaps changed the course of our nation forever. This election pitted John C. Breckinridge against Lincoln, and several other canidates. Breckinridge had been a Representative and was the incumbent Vice-President under Buchanan. He alligne with the Southern Faction of the Democratic Party after the party became deeply divided over the issue of slavery. During the election, he took the second most electoral votes by effectively sweeping the South, but he didn't get the second most popular votes, that title goes to Stephen Douglas of the Northern Democratic Party. After the election, he took his seat in the Senate and actually still fought for compromise to preserve the union. But his efforts were pointless, as the South was too enraged over the fact that a President could be elected without any support from the South (among many other things), and 7 states had already seceded. The country continued to descend into Civil War. Who knows what would have happened if Breckinridge had become President?

    • Honorable Mentions of the 1860 Election
Stephen A. Douglas of the Northern Democratic Party
John Bell of the Constitutional Union Party

Name: John C. McClellan
Lost to: Abraham Lincoln
Party: Democratic
Year: 1864
Description: The election of 1864 was held in the middle of the Civil War, The Confederate States obiviously did not participate in this election. John McClellan was a top general during the Civil War but had an awkward relationship with Lincoln. McCellan headed the Peninsula Campaign which was suppose to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond. The Campaign failed with retreas back from General Lee's smaller armies, this was rather embarrasing. Lincoln also wasnt impressed with McCllelan's performance at Antietam where he allowed a smaller force led by Lee to retreat without beThing totally destroyed. Lincoln began to question his leadership skills and relieved McCellan of his duties. When he was nominated by the Democrats, he severely hurt his chances to win the election by not following the party's anti-war platform. He ended up losing in a landslide vote.

Name: Horatio Seymour
Lost to: Ulysses S. Grant
Party: Democratic
Year: 1868
Description: This election was held in the aftermath of the Civil War. It was going to be basically impossible for Seymour to win, considering he was a Democrat and they were generally associated with the South. Seymour was a former Governor of New York. He had everything fighting against him in this election. GRant was extremely popular in the North for being the Union General. He had the support of many new Freedmen in the South, and many white voters had been disenfranchised for the time being. Also, 3 Confederate sates had not yet been admitted back into the Union. He had no chance of winning this election.

Name: Horace Greeley
Lost to: Ulysses S. Grant
Party: Liberal Republican
Year: 1872
Description: This is another interesting election with a few twist involved. Greeley was a former Representative who use to follow the Whig and Republican Parties as well as oppose slavery. He founded the Liberal Republican Party in response to corruption within Grant's administration and caused a split. He actually had a legitimate chance to win. He took many voters away from the Republican side and also voters from the Democratic side. But during the election, after the popular vote but before the electoral vote, Greeley died. As a result, many electors who were going to vote for him sent their votes elswhere, they weren't going to vote for a corpse. 6 men ended up recieving electoral votes this year but Grant won buy a comfortable margin. But if Greeley hadn't died, who knows?

Name: Samuel Tilden
Lost to: Rutherford B. Hayes
Party: Democratic
Year: 1876
Description: The electionof 1876 was another landmark election. Tilden was a lawyer who served as the Governor of New York right before he decided to run for President. The South was still in the process of Reconstruction and still being occupied by troops. When the election took place, Tilden won the popular vote by a solid margin of over 200,000 votes. But over 20 electoral votes were being disputed over by the end of the election. After a bitter and long political and legal battle, and informal deal known as the Compromise of 1877 was struck. Hayes was to be named President of military occupation of the South ended. Hayes eneded up being awarded enough electoral votes and beat Tilden by 1 vote. This election basically marked the end of Reconstruction and even though Tilden didn't become President, he deserves a lot of credit.

Name: Winfield Hancock
Lost to: James A. Garfield
Party: Democratic
Year: 1880
Description: In 1880, the Democrats nominate Winfield Hancock, a man with over four decades of military experience ranging from the Mexican-American War to the Civil War, where he was renound for his leadership in Gettysburg. However, he had never held a political office. He was nominated because of his status as a War Hero and his pro states' rights views. This election actually had an interesting result. Hayes didnt seek reelection for a second term. So Hancock wen't up against Congressman Garfield. But still, you would expect a man with no political experience to be demolished on the Presidential election. But no, this is to date the closest popular vote in history. Garfield recieved less than 2000 votes more than Hancock but defeated him comfortably in the electoral college.

Name: James G. Blaine
Lost to: Grover Cleveland
Party: Republican
Year: 1884
Description: The election of 1884 saw an incredibly qualified canidate defeated. The Republicans nominate James G. Blaine, who had served in the House of Representatives, in the Senate, had been Speaker of the House, and the Secretary of State. After and incredibly dirty and rough campaign by both canidates, Grover Cleveland was elected the first Democratic President of the United States since the Civil War.

Name: Grover Cleveland
Lost to: Benjamin Harrison
Party: Democratic
Year:1888
Description: This election saw the fall incumbent President Clevelend, who had also served as the Governor of New York and the Mayor of Buffaloe. Its rather puzzling as to why Clevelend lost this election. The economy was prosperous and people were happy. But the campaing was driven by debates over tariff rates and Clevelend ended up struggling in a few swing states, and in some states, the voting booths were accused of being of a less than truthful nature. Clevelend won the popular vote, but he fell in the electoral college and Harrison, the grandson of former President Henry Harrison, was elected.


Name: Benjamin Harrison
Lost to: Grover Cleveland
Party: Republican
Year: 1892
Description: This election saw the defeat of incumbent President and former Senator Harrison, to a less than traditional opponent. This is the only time i history we have had a President run against another President. Harrison lost by a fairly sized margin in both the popular vote and the electoral and Cleveland became the first and only President to serve two non-consecutive terms in office. This election also saw the beginning of the Populist movement, more on that later...

    • Honorable Mention of 1892 Election
James B. Weaver of the Populist Party

Name: Williams Jennings Bryan
Lost to: William McKinley
Party: Democratic ( Fused with Populists)
Year: 1896
Description: This election saw the culmination of the Populist movement and is one of the most influential election to date in my mind. Bryan, who had served in the House of Representatives, had come to represent this movement and was now seen as the champion of the common man. What ended up happening was the Democrats basically ended up wanting to nominate Bryan, who was a Populists. Obviously the Populists wanted to nominate Bryan also but they realized he would have a better chance of winning if he ran as a Democrat. So the Populists ended up investing all their chips into this deal and essentially fused with the Democrats. Bryan was an incredibl speaker and dedicated campigner. He revolutionized the way people go after the Presidency. Before, it was considered highly unprofessional to "run" for office. But Bryan didn't care. he knew that if he didn't try to reach out to the voters he wouldnt have a chance to win. He went to every corner of the country to talk to the average citizen. Some were offended by this new tactic, but others were inspired and amazed by this young passionate man from Nebraska. However, McKinley, with the support of wealthy businessmen and bankers, won the election by sitting in his front porch. What a shame. The Populists basically invested everythign into this fusion with the Democrats and lost everything when Bryan lost. The party basically fizzled out from here and movement of the people, of this magnitude, would never happen again.

Name: William Jennings Bryan
Lost to: William McKinley
Party: Democratic
Year: 1900
Description: This election pitted the two same canidates against eachother as the year before. But this time, Bryan didnt have the momentum of the Populists movement behind him like he quite did last time (see election of 1896). But he still put of a good campaign and many people still voted for him. But McKinley, with his new Vice-President Roosevelt, ended up winning.


Name: Alton Parker
Lost to: Theodore Roosevelt
Party: Democratic
Year: 1904
Description: In 1904 the Democrats nominated the Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals Alton Parker. Parker was a Bourbon Democrat who had been alienated by the party when they choe to nominate Bryan in the prior election. Parker still didn't appeal to the followers of Bryan and as a result lost to the beloved Roosevelt after he only was able to carry the southern states.

Name: William J Bryan
Lost to: William Taft
Party: Democratic
Year: 1908
Description: The Democrats once again turned to William J Bryan after the Republicans had held office for 16 years. Bryan still appealed to the liberal Democrats and he tried to appeal to the more wealthy business side of America as well. But he failed to do so and he suffered his worst presidential defeat to former Secretary of War Taft, who had essentially been handpicked by Roosevelt to run.

Name: Theodore Roosevelt
Lost to: Woodrow Wilson
Party: Progressive
Year: 1912
Description: The election of 1912 was very messy. Former President Roosevelt had returned from his time abroad and when he arrived, he was very unhappy with how President Taft had been running things. He decided he was interested in running for President once again. However, the Republicans weren't going to nominate him over incumbent President Taft. So Roosevelt decided to create the Progressive Party and run anyway. But as a result, Roosevelt and Taft split the Republican vote and opened the door for Wilson, the Democratic nominee, to win.

Name: Charles E. Hughs
Lost to: Woodrow Wilson
Party: Republican
Year: 1916
Description: In 1916, the Republicans decided to nominate Charles E Hughs, a Republican Lawer who had served as the Governor of New York and as an Associate Supreme Court Justice. One of the biggest debates throughout the campaign cycle was the raging Great War. Hughs disagreed with Wilsons ideas about the war and these debates are what drove most of the election. Hughs lost by only 13 electoral votes.

Name: James Cox
Lost to: Warren G. Harding
Party: Democratic
Year: 1920
Description: In 1920, the Democrats nominated an Ohio man named James Cox. Cox had served in the House of Representatives and had also served as the Governor of Ohio twice. Cox chose FDR as his Vice-Presidential canidate, at this time he was the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Harding never really considered Cox a legitimate canidate and really did most of his campaigning against President Wilson. Cox lost this election by almost 300 electoral votes and by the largest margin of defeat in the popular vote in our countries history. Interesting fact: of the four men runnung in this election (the 2 presidential and 2 vice-presidential canidates) Cox was the only one never to become President.

Name: John W. Davis
Lost to: Calvin Coolidge
Party: Democratic
Year: 1924
Description: John W. Davis had an incredibly succesful legal career as well as several political accomplishments. He had served in the House of Representatives, as the Ambassador to the UK and as the Solicitor General of the United States under President Wilson. Davis was a more conservative Democrat and many conservatitives decided to vote for Coolidge while more liberal Democrats voted for the Progressive Party Canidate, Senator La Follete.

Name: Al Smith
Lost to: Herbert Hoover
Party: Republican
Year: 1928
Description: Al Smith was a "wet" Democrat who had been elected the Governor of New York four times and had long been regarded as a potential President. During the election, the Republicans rode the success that the economy had felt during the Coolidge and Harding administrations. As a catholic, he suffered from the anti-catholic ideas that were strong int he south and he also couldnt escape his involvement he had with the corruption of Tammany Hall. Hoover won the election with over 44 electoral votes.

Name: Herbert Hoover
Lost to: Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Party: Republican
Year: 1932
Description: The 1932 election took place during the Great Depression and when hate for Hoover was strong. Franklin Delano Roosevelt had been a Senator, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, the Governor of New York, and a Vive-Presidential Canidate. Roosevelt attacked Hoover and his economic policies and blamed him for the Great Depression. He promised relief and a recovery of the economy if he was elected. His campaign worked and he was elected by a huge margin of victory.

Name: Alf Landon
Lost to: Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Party: Republican
Year: 1936
Description: In 1936, the Republicans nominated Alf Landon, the Governor of Kansas and a more moderate man on the political scale. This election took place as the Deprssion was entering its 8th year. Roosevelt's New Deal policies had become extremely popular with many Americans and he was still pushing new ideas through the Congress and the Courts. Roosevelt won the election by the largest electoral vote margin in history with 523 out of 531 electoral votes.

Name: Wendell Willkie
Lost to: Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Party: Republican
Year: 1940
Description: In 1940, the Republicans nominated a liberal businessman named Wendell Willkie who really emerged as a "dark horse" canidate. Willkie campaigned against some of Roosevelts New Deal policies which he believed were anti-business and inefficient. He flipp flopped on the issue of the raging war in Europe and this ultimately cost him votes. Roosevelt broke tradition and won his third term by a comfortable margin.

Name: Thomas E Dewey
Lost to: Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Party: Republican
Year: 1944
Description: The Republicans once again nominated a more moderate liberal Republican in the 1944 election. They nominated the Governor of New York, Thomas Dewey. The Republicans continued to campaign against the New Deal and the issue of the war didnt dominate the elctio, becasue the end of the war was seemingly in sight. Dewey ran a good campaign, but once again, the popularity of Roosevelt prevailed and he won his historic fourth term.

Name: Thomas E Dewey
Lost to: Harry Truman
Party: Republican
Year: 1948
Description: This is really the first interesting election our country had in some time. Thomas Dewey seemed unbeatable in this election and nearly everyone expected him to win. The Democratic party had splintered as essentially 3 Democrats were splitting the vote. You had Truman, Wallace of the new Progressive Party, and Strom Thurmond of the Dixiecrat Party. Dewey and the Republicans believed all he had to do was avoid any major mistakes during his campaign and he was a lock for President. But he did that too often. He refused to discuss controversial issues and never really discussed what he would do as President. This approach is what helped Truman pull off what has been considered one of the greatest election surprises in history.

Name: Adlai Stevenson
Lost to: Dwight D Eisenhower
Party: Democratic
Year: 1952
Description: In 1952, Truman decided not to run once again, so the Democrats nominated Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson. The Democratic campaign spent a lot of time actually focusing on Republican Senator Mccarthy and how he had been fueling the Communist scare. The Republican nominated war hero Eisenhower, promoted attacking Korea, Communism, and Corruption, and he won the election with over 400 electoral votes.

Name: Adlai Stevenson
Lost to: Dwight D Eisenhower
Party: Democratic
Year: 1958
Description: The election of the 1958 was a re-match of the the 1952 election and almost exactly the same. Stevenson was hurt by the fact that he wasn't holding a political office and hadn't for three years and he didn't really have a strong base following. Eisenhower won the election once again by a margin similar to that he garnered four years earlier.

Name: Richard Nixon
Lost to: John F. Kennedy
Party: Republican
Year: 1960
Description: Richard Nixon was a very qualified canidate during the 1960 election and had a really good chance of winning it. Nixon was the incumbent Vice-President and had also previously served in the Senate and House of Representatives. Nixon lost this election for several reasons. Kennedy was a devoted Catholic and gained the support of most Catholic voters in the Country, Nixon continually talked about his political experiences in the past and nothing else, and Nixon campaigned in all 50 states instead of focusing on the few swing states which he ended up losing. He also lost some support in the South too the Kennedy ticket which had Lyndon Johnson on it, a Texan. The election still ended up being closer than many previous elections. Kennedy won with 303 votes to 219.

Name: Barry Goldwater
Lost to: Lyndon B Johnson
Party: Republican
Year: 1964
Description: Barry Goldwater was a very conservative Republican politician who was the Senator of Arizona. He failed to gain the total support of his entire party which really hurt him throughout the election. Johnson was able to successfully portray Goldwater as an extremist and the incumbent President who took over for the assassinated Kennedy won the election easily.

Name: Hubert Humphrey
Lost to: Richard Nixon
Party: Democratic
Year: 1968
Description: The election of 1968 took place during a weird time in our nations history. Racial tensions were extremely high an many people felt very passionately and differently over the issue. The war in Vietnam was another hot issue of the day. The election pitted Hubert Humphrey, the incumbent Vice-President, the 1st Deputy President Pro Tempore of the Senate, former Senate Majority Whip, and former Mayor of Minneapolis, against another former Vice-President, Richard Nixon, who had previously won for the Presidency and lost. The Democratic Party had many people who disagreed over the issue of racial tension in the United States and as a result, the party split several times which really hurt Humphreys bid and cost him votes. The largest faction that split off was called the American Independent party and was led by Governor George Wallace. He actually won most of the deep southern states. Its very possible this loss of votes could have cost Humphrey the election as Nixon took home 301 electoral votes and the win.

Name: George McGovern
Lost to: Richard Nixon
Party: Republican
Year: 1972
Description: This election was a landslide, plain and simple. The Democrats nominated South Dakota Congressman George McGovern after a hotly contested Democratic Primary. Nixon had a very good first term and won the election by emphasizing the good state of the economy, ending the Vietnam War, and establishing a good relationship with China. McGovern won one state and DC and only took home 14 electoral votes to Nixon's 520. I bet he felt like quite a loser. Another interesting fact was this was the first election that saw an African American run for a major party nomination, and the first time an Asian American ran for the Democratic Nomination. Even more intersting... they were both women. Shirley Chisholm, the African American, survived 3 assassination attempts during her campaign and took home just over 152 delegate votes as the convention, not nearly enough, but rather astonishing considering the circumstances.

Name: Gerald Ford
Lost to: Jimmy Carter
Party: Republican
Year: 1976
Description: In the 1976 election, Gerald Ford was the Incumbent President, former Vice-President, House Minority Leader, and Congressman. Ford was hindered by a struggling economy and recieving scrutiny from his decision to pardon former President Nixon after his involvement in the Watergate Scandal. Ford actually won a majority of States but lost a close electoral vote to Jimmy Carter.

Name: Jimmy Carter
Lost to: Ronald Reagan
Party: Democratic
Year: 1980
Description: In the election of 1980, incumbent President Jimmy Carter lost his bid for re-election. Carter had also served as a Senator and as the Governor of Georgia. The election took place while the nation's economy was in a worsening state and the Iranian Hostage Crisis was happening. Reagan ended up winning the election in a landslide electoral vote

Name: Walter Mondale
Lost to: Ronald Reagan
Party: Democratic
Year: 1984
Description: This election saw the biggest margin of victory in our history. Walter Mondale, the former Attorney General of Minnesota, Senator, and former Vice-President. Reagan coasted off of the recovering economy his extreme popularity. Reagan got 525 electoral votes to Mondale's 13.

Name: Michael Dukakis
Lost to: George HW Bush
Party: Democratic
Year: 1988
Description: In 1988, the Democrats nominated former Representative and Governor of Massachusetts Michael Dukakis. During the election, Bush coasted off of Reagan's accomplishments. Dukakis was also constantly attacked by Bush in the media and he always failed to retaliate. Mondale only brought in 111 electorial votes and lost the election to Bush.

Name: George HW Bush
Lost to: Bill Clinton
Party: Republican
Year: 1992
Description: The election of 1992 saw the fall of incumbent President George HW Bush, who had also served as Vice-President, a Congressman, the Ambassador the UN, and the Director of the CIA. One big reason he most likely lost the election to Clinton was actually the canidacy of Independent Ross Perot. Ross Perot had the best showing of a third party canidate in a long time and garnered an impressive 19 million votes. Clinton had about 5 million more popular votes than Bush and its very possible the Perot cost Bush some swing states by taking away votes in extremely contested political areas.

Name: Bob Dole
Lost to: Bill Clinton
Party: Republican
Year: 1996
Description: Bob Dole was the a former Representative and former Senate Majority and Minority Leader. He was going up against incumbent President Clinton. While Clinton was wildly popular and could begin campaigning early, Dole was stuck still trying to win over his own party. After he finally did, Clinto claime he would cut popular programs such as Medicare and Social Security. Clinton also compared him the unpopular Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. In the end, the much older and less energized Dole failed to conduct a campaign that helped him come back from these hits from Clinton and the much younger and upbeat Clinton won his second term.

Name: Al Gore
Lost to: George W Bush
Party: Democratic
Year: 2000
Description: In the year 2000, an infamous election took place that really hit a nerve with many Americans and made them question our voting system. This was the first really modern election that saw a man take home more popular votes, but not the Presidency. Al Gore was a former Congressman and the incumbent Vice-President. He was going up against Texas Governor George W Bush, son of former President George HW Bush. During the election, Florida quickly became the problem state. After the election night, at about 2:30 in the morning, many people declared that Florida had been won by Bush,and he was leading by over 100,000 votes at the time. But many votes were yet to hgave been counted, all of them from heavily Democratic areas of the state. After all those areas' votes had been counted, Bush's lead was only about 2000 votes. When a lead is that small, the law states ballots must be recounted. After the recount, the lead Bush had in the state was down to 300 votes. Gore requested a manual recount of the votes in several counties, Florida's Secretary of State, a Republican, decided that she would not acknowledge the recount numbers if they werent submitted by the 14 of November. The Florida Supreme Court decided to extend that deadline to the 26th. Miami-Dade cunty still decided to halt its recount and submitt its original numbers while Palm Beach County failed to meet the deadline. Gore contested once again and he wanted 70,000 ballots that had been rejected by the machine counters to be counted. The US Supreme Court decided that the hand counting of these ballots degraded their quality and integrity, and essentially 70,000 ballots were thrown out. Bush took the state of Florida's electoral votes which gave him 271 to Gore's 266. Gore took home over 500,000 more popular votes than Bush.

Name: John Kerry
Lost to: George W Bush
Party: Democratic
Year: 2004
Description: In 2004, the Democrats nominated John Kerry, former Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts and Senator. The topics that dominated much of the election were foreign policy related. Particularly the way Bush handled the War on Terrorism and the Invasion of Iraq, which made rather unpopular with some people, but really popular with others. Kerry was portrayed a by Bush as a weak leader who wouldn't be able to conduct a war. Essentially Bush came to be pro-war while Kerry was anti-war, and it was upt to the American people to choose what they wanted. The country, still haunted by September 11th elected Bush, the man who started the War of Terrorism and vowed to continue it.

Name: John McCain
Lost to: Barack Obama
Party: Republican
Year: 2008
Description: 2008 saw a heated election which many people felt passionately about, voter turnout was huge by todays standards. John McCain was nominated by the Republicans. He was a Senator was Arizona and a Vietnam veteran. John McCain was hurt by the horrible recession and the worsening popularity of President Bush and by association, the Republican Party. McCain's Vice-Presidential canidate Sarah Palin, also hurt his canidacy quit a bit. At first, she helped him spike in the polls, but after some less than shining moments in the media, she caused McCain's popularity to drop signifigantly. The main issues that dominated the campaigns were economy and the wars that America was involved in. Obama won the election with the most popular votes in our nations history and became the first African American President.

Name: Mitt Romney
Lost to: Barack Obama
Party: Republican
Year: 2012
Description: The election of 2012, was another interesting an important one for the Republican Party. Former Governor Romney was nominated by the Republican Party. Thanks to some poor comments and mispoken phrases, not to mention several less than sensitive comments regarding rape by his Republican Senators, Obama won the election. But thats not whats super important. Whats notable from this election who vote for both parties. This election really showed that younger America was and is becoming more and more liberal, not to mention all the minorities that in large voted for the Democratic Party. The Demographics behind this election really showed that the Republican Party was falling out of favor with a hige bulk of the American Population, and if these trends continued, the Republican party would keep losing more and more support. This election showed the Republican Party that they really needed to start appealing to younger generations and minority groups that voted overwelmingly Liberal in the previous election.