Really nice job on these entries Peyton. Well done. -SW
APUSH Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/user/purpledaisybug-us/playlist/7cUJLXsl62th0upDYxQ6nj?si=sKzK0WtfTuO9Laihvq87SA
Statement
For me, the hardest part of finding these songs was keeping within the American ships. There were plenty of songs about historic ships, but a lot of them focused more on European history or seas shanties. I did include some famous sea shanties that were carried through history and sung by American crews as well. I had to narrow down the list by choosing the most famous ships and the songs that told more of a story than a repetition of lyrics about floating in the ocean. I tried getting songs from multiple time periods but the best I could get for the olden days were the sea shanties. There were quite a few about civil war ship battles between the confederate and the union so I tried not to pick too many of those. The songs are mostly part of the Civil War and World War 2. However I did try to find pieces that were about ships not involved in battles like the titanic.

Unit Seven: Emergence of a Strong National Government
The election of Hoover aligned with the start of the Great Depression sent people into lives of poverty and hopelessness. The living conditions were named Hoovervilles. The shacks and tents were set up by homeless people during the depression in order to create some sense of a house. They got so bad that there were tents and trash houses built to the sizes of neighborhoods. They used scrap metal and old cloth to build a shelter that was unreliable for the majority of the time but it worked because it was all the people had. Some homeless people didn't even have the shacks to live in, they slept under what little cloth they had and were often times stranded on the road trying to travel west to escape the depression. Many families lived in their cars that were already crowded with what little items they had left from selling their home. The living conditions were horrible and if the people didn't have a fridge or another food preserving item, there was no way to save the little food they could afford.

Forms of entertainment were free. The people would play board games or children would litter the streets with their sports equipment. The only thing that was still used, that cost money, was the movie theater. The movies were ways for the people to escape reality and relax for once. If they could afford it, some families would even listen to the radio for fun.

Children were often times taken out of school to help bring in money by working low wage jobs that could contribute to their living conditions. They couldn't afford any luxuries but they were, like stated in the latter paragraph, able to play games with the other children who lived in the Hoovervilles.
Hoovervilles
Hoovervilles

Hoovervilles
Hoovervilles

Unit Six: A Modern Country
The KKK was created in the early 1860's in response to the Reconstruction Era when African Americans first started gaining rights. They had been granted freedom and the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments were giving them a position in society. The south had a very hard time integrating the black people into their society not as slaves and that resulted in the abrupt creation of many white supremacist groups that violently protested rights for African Americans. The Ku Klux Klan was one of the strongest groups. They used to burn crosses in the yards of African Americans or white men who worked to end racism and use violence to "persuade" (terrify) voters into voting for the representative who was most likely to sympathize with the south. However, many people believe the Klan started simply to frighten the people without violence. They used their numbers to convince people the ghosts of confederate soldiers were riding the hills at night. They would stop at houses on the hillside, dressed in long white clothes with covered faces and ask the residents for a bucket of water. They would then pretend to drink it but the water would go down a tube hidden under their robes. They would precede to ask for more water and in the end exclaim that they had not had a drink since they died at the battle of Shiloh. The Klan would obviously grow into a more violent, angry group of people who promoted terror and racism among the divided south. They escalated to the whipping and beating of black people, southern unionists, and northerners who had moved south.

Most of Georgia and Tennessee were thought to have joined the KKK by the time the Jim Crow laws were passed but it was also used as a cover for those who were committing personal crimes. Anyone could put on white robes and masks and ride into the night to rape, beat, murder, or rob anyone they pleased. The Klan was simply a cover. The governments effort to end the violence was only met with more of it. Many spies inserted into the Klan were discovered quickly and found hanging in trees, mutilated and beaten, or even drowned after being shoved into barrels and thrown in the rivers.

The Klan was able to hold power for so long because the people hiding behind the white cloth were politicians, editors, and officers who were able to guide the group. The violence got worse before it got better, Lynchings, shootings, and mutilations grew in numbers before the Klan died down. The group would reappear multiple more times in history and can still be found, in smaller factions and numbers, today.
KKK Burns A Cross in Someones Yard
KKK Burns A Cross in Someones Yard

A Member of the KKK
A Member of the KKK














Unit Three: Consolidating the Union
The Battle of New Orleans was fought at the end of the war of 1812, it was bloody and had a very large casualty count. The British were hoping that this attack would be the final blow to take down their enemies in the war. They wanted to show the colonies their strength. New Orleans was considered the gateway into the United States so it made sense for them to attack the most valuable place in the country. Andrew Jackson rushed to lead the army into the battle when he heard the British were planning an attack. He had been held as a prisoner of war during the revolutionary war and wanted revenge on his British captors.

The war started on the 23 of December as Jackson launched a nighttime attack. The British immediately took lives of the American army. Cannon balls were flying and taking of heads, there were piles of dead bodies all over the field. Nearing the end of the battle, the British new they had been defeated. The army was retreating back near "line Jackson". Some people were running or crawling. The battle had severe casualties but was a win for the U.S.
Image result for battle of new orleans
Image result for battle of new orleans


Unit Two: American Revolution

Image result for tar and feathering
Image result for tar and feathering

There were some common ways people were punished during the American Revolution and leading up to it. Taring and feathering were the most common. Tax collectors and other European employees were the main targets of the enraged colonists. To protest acts like the tea act and the stamp act, the colonies would torture the people helping to enact the "laws". Taring and feathering was a horrible act that left people burned and even sometimes dead. Colonists would attack the tax collectors, cover them in hot tar, throw feathers all over them, and sometimes string them up to intensify the public humiliation. In the image above, they were pouring hot tea down the victim's throat to protest the tea act.

There were many other acts of protest that were nonviolent like burning effigies, boycotting British goods, and refusing to sell goods to Britain. This put pressure on the economic and political positions in British without killing the messenger who worked for them. Another way people protested was by supporting and creating governmental committees much like the Committee of Correspondence or the First Continental Congress. These acts, unlike taring and feathering, were long-term devices that were meant to help stop the conflict between Britain and its colonies.

In history, sometimes violent acts are the ones that stand out so prominently because of their horrific beginnings and endings. In reality, though, the acts that made a difference were nonviolent. Protests like Martin Luther King and Gandhi's brought change through peaceful acts. They are admired and not questioned because of their acts.


Unit One: Settlement and Colonization

The trans Atlantic slave trade helped transfer many diseases, foods, animals, and even people. The middle passage allowed for the transfer of around millions of slaves. Around 2 million slaves died during the passage and each ship voyage held anywhere from 250-600 slaves. The conditions were unhealthy and life threatening. The Africans were forced into the bottom of the boat and crammed into small areas. There was no good food or water and so many Africans died from diseases passed in the ship. The middle passage usually took more than 7 weeks to get through. The combination of being fed once, maybe two times a day, and the horrific living conditions led to the deaths of millions over the passing years.


Image result for slave ships
Image result for slave ships