Unit 6? Good details on him...how was he connected to the Gilded Age?
"Boss" Tweed

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Image result for boss tweed

William Magear Tweed born April 3, 1823 was an american politician of the democratic party known for being the boss of Tammany Hall. With his "Tweed Ring" cronies he plundered New York City of sums estimated at between 30,000,000 and 200,000,000 dollars. Tweed was a bookkeeper and when he was elected to a term in Congress he was gradually strengthening his position in Tammany Hall. (probably so that he could easily steal more money) Then he was elected to a new bipartisan city board of supervisors, and after that he held other important positions in the city government all while sending his cronies to other key city and country posts. (which established the Tweed Ring) Of course he eventually got caught stealing the money from New York and was tried on charges of forgery and larceny, he was sentenced to prison in 1873 was released in 1875 then rearrested on a civil charge. But he escaped to Cuba then Spain again arrested then sent back to the U.S and then sent back to the New York jail where he died.
I'm not sure what gave Tweed the great idea to steal money, he was definitely a very corrupt man and very greedy, and maybe that's the only reason why he stole the money. What I do know though is that "Boss" Tweed definitely got what was coming to him. After stealing so much money, escaping from prison, and hiding in Spain, he completely deserved the rearrestings and imprisonment.
Citation:
The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. “William Magear Tweed.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 20 Mar. 2017, www.britannica.com/biography/William-Magear-Tweed.

Griswold-Lyons Affair
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Image result for griswold lyon fight

On February 15, 1798 in Philadelphia's congress hall a fight broke out between Roger Griswold and Matthew Lyon. When Lyon pelted Griswold with a stream of tobacco juice spit, Griswold had had enough of Lyon and grabbing his cane went forward and started beating Lyon with it. Then to protect himself Lyon went to the fireplace, grabbed the fire tongs, and started beating Griswold with it. This encounter was seeded by an earlier insult from Griswold towards Lyon that referenced Lyon's cowardice during the Revolutionary War. Then after those two were separated by other members of the congress there was a resolution that expelled both Griswold and Lyon from their congress membership.

The Boston Massacre
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Image result for boston massacre

The Boston Massacre is an event that happened in 1770, when a colonist mob was throwing snowballs and rocks at a sentry. Redcoats were called to help support the sentry and get the colonists away. No one really knows if the redcoats fired the first shot or if a colonist just shot a warning shot, but the next thing anyone knew the mob dispersed leaving three dead and two wounded, who died later due to their injuries. This event was one of many key events that united the colonists against the British.

Salem Witch trials and Cotton Mather
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Image result for salem witch trials

The Salem Witch Trials were started in 1692, when a group of girls claimed to be possessed by a demon or the devil. Then accused several women for practicing this evil magic. Mostly women who lived right on the outer regions of Salem Village, and who were either not puritan or were puritan, but weren't completely devote to the religion. So being seen as different and/or dangerous, innocent women were killed.

During this time, Cotton Mather's book helped shape the behavior of the girls "afflicted" by witchcraft. I once believed him to be the judge or minister that sentenced all the alleged witches to death, but after some research I learned that, while he was a minister, he merely sent a letter to one of the magistrates urging caution that all evidence, and not just spectral evidence, had to be used in the trial. As people could be making up a dream about seeing a shadow or figure entering an accused witch just to make sure that person was found guilty and killed. What doesn't make sense to me about Cotton Mather is that after the final hangings, he wrote another book, The Wonders of the Invisible World, that was basically justifying the accusations and deaths of the "witchs" in Salem. So it makes me wonder was he actually secretly supporting the witch trials, or was he really not okay with the witch trials?

Citation:
http://www.history.com/topics/salem-witch-trials
http://salem.lib.virginia.edu/people/c_mather.html